Short-term Trade and Supply Chain Finance 2013

Short-term Trade and Supply Chain Finance 2013


Nov 25 - Nov 26, 2013
The Westin Grand Munich, Arabellastrasse 6, Munich

The must-attend event for Trade and Supply Chain Finance professionals.

Click here to download the agenda

Here's what our clients said about our 2013 event:

  • Ashley Skaanild

    Ashley Skaanild Head of Liner and Bulker Solutions, ESS (EMEA) Limited

    It was the best organised, moderated conference I've been to for ages, wealth of topics but not too broad. Good participation with plenty of opportunity to contribute to discussions

  • Christian Nehk

    Christian Nehk Director Global Trade and Supply Chain Finance, Bank of America Merrill Lynch (BAML)

    Refreshing new concept and good mix between banks and corporates

  • Friedemann Kirchhof

    Friedemann Kirchhof Head of Supply Chain Finance, Siemens Treasury GmbH

    Well organised conference with a good speaker line-up

  • Olamide Olaofe

    Olamide Olaofe Product Manager, Citi

    Excellent industry update with good networking opportunities

  • Fred De Brabander

    Fred De Brabander Financial Controller, Philips Group Procurement

    Good for networking

  • Hai Yen Ho

    Hai Yen Ho director, Vietnam Joint stock commercial bank for industry and trade

    This conference provides useful knowledges of experiences about a new and advanced product like Supply Chain Finance

  • Sigrid Schwerdtner

    Sigrid Schwerdtner , Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS)

    Relevant topics for Supply Chain Finance/trade finance reflected

  • Bertie Kerr

    Bertie Kerr Assistant Vice President, Deutsche Bank

    The latest developments and most up to date thinking in trade finance

  • Eran Charit

    Eran Charit Director, Aon

    TXF's conference was well attended by the industry, leading to interesting discussions

Conference themes

1) Supply Chain Finance 2.0

The ‘industry’ - as it is defined; is at something of a crossroads.

Short-term Trade & Supply Chain Finance 2013 is a forum for the senior players in this sector – providers, importers, exporters, users and non-users – to address the obstacles to development, and refine the term and the product.

We aim to close the knowledge gap. More institutions need to get their head around what different products mean, and how valuable they really could be.

We will take the debate forward. The term 'supply chain finance' has changed. The way it can be used is still unclear. The size of the market cannot be questioned.

But what is holding the sector back?

Within a myriad of different solutions...

What do importers and exports actually need?
How will it effect their business?

This forum will look at how we can gear up for the expansion of supply chain finance, and what this will look like.

2) The evolution of short-term trade finance: Universal provision, standardization and efficiency through innovation

The world of short-term trade finance is far wider, but often gets swallowed up by discussions on supply-chain finance. Therefore, coverage of innovations that are an alternative to supply chain are of equal importance.

  How has the issuance of LCs evolved?
  How much of the process can be automated?
  Are different players in the industry asking for too much documentation?
  What other solutions to the challenges of working capital exist?
  How big can securitization of trade receivables be?
  Will it always be a niche area?
  How have export credit agencies become involved in support of SMEs and short-term trade?

Guests from the following companies attended our 2013 event:

  • Markus Wohlgeschaffen
    Markus Wohlgeschaffen

    Head of Global Trade Finance & Services, Global Transaction Banking
    UniCredit
  • Enrico Camerinelli
    Enrico Camerinelli

    Director and Chief Analyst
    Aite Group
  • Michael Henke
    Michael Henke

    Professor
    Fraunhofer Institute for Material Flow and Logistics, IML
  • Wadim Büttner
    Wadim Büttner

    CFT CON
    OSRAM GmbH
  • David Wuttke
    David Wuttke

    Assistant Professor
    EBS Business School

  • John Ahearn
    John Ahearn

    Managing Director, Global Head of Trade
    Citi
  • Gary Slawther
    Gary Slawther

    Corporate Treasurer
    Octal Petrochemicals
  • Jonathan Bell
    Jonathan Bell

    Editor in Chief
    TXF
  • Mathieu Le Brigand
    Mathieu Le Brigand

    Global Head of Supply Chain Management, Global Transaction Banking / Global Trade Services
    BNP Paribas
  • Urs Kern
    Urs Kern

    Senior Sales Manager - Corporate Business
    Swift Transport

  • Oliver Spitz
    Oliver Spitz

    Director, Trade Products & Services, Global Transaction Banking
    UniCredit
  • Tom Dunn
    Tom Dunn

    Chairman
    Orbian
  • Max Falkenberg
    Max Falkenberg

    Partner, Co-Head Global Competence Centre Corporate Performance
    Roland Berger Strategy Consultants GmBH
  • Friedemann Kirchhof
    Friedemann Kirchhof

    Head of Supply Chain Finance
    Siemens Treasury GmbH
  • John Luu
    John Luu

    Executive Director
    JP Morgan

  • Adrian Katz
    Adrian Katz

    Chief Executive Officer
    Finacity
  • Rudolf Putz
    Rudolf Putz

    Head of Trade Facilitation Programme
    European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)
  • Beate Hofmann
    Beate Hofmann

    Director | Regionsleiterin Trade Finance / Cash Management Corporates
    Deutsche Bank
  • Dominique Meesen
    Dominique Meesen

    Head of Underwriting and Account Management
    Credendo
  • Neil Ross
    Neil Ross

    Trade Credit Regional Manager, EMEA
    AIG - Global Trade & Political Risk Insurance

  • Fred De Brabander
    Fred De Brabander

    Financial Controller
    Philips Group Procurement
  • Michael Spiegel
    Michael Spiegel

    Global Head Of Trade Finance & Cash Management Corporates
    Deutsche Bank
  • Pinaki Roy
    Pinaki Roy

    Vice President - Project Treasury
    Reliance Industries Limited
 

BREakFasT BRiEFiNG

  • Enrico Camerinelli

    Enrico Camerinelli Supply Chain Programme Development, UNECE and Senior Analyst, Aite Group

cHaiRMaN's OpENiNG REMaRks

  • Jonathan Bell

    Jonathan Bell Editor-in-Chief, TXF

 

WhAT cORpORATe TReAsuReRs ReAlly WAnT, WhAT BAnks ReAlly WAnT

  • Gary Slawther

    Gary Slawther Corporate Treasurer, OCTAL Petrochemicals

  • Michael Spiegel

    Michael Spiegel Global Head of Cash Management and Trade Finance, Deutsche Bank

 

a NEW ROaDMap FOR supply cHaiN FiNaNcE: WHaT is supply cHaiN FiNaNcE aNyWay?

  • Thomas Dunn

    Thomas Dunn Chairman, Orbian

  • Markus Wohlgeschaffen

    Markus Wohlgeschaffen Managing Director, Global Head of Trade Finance & Services, Unicredit Group

  • Mathieu Le Brigand

    Mathieu Le Brigand Global Head of Supply Chain Management, Global Transaction Banking / Global Trade Solutions, BNP Paribas

  • Gary Slawther

    Gary Slawther Corporate Treasurer, OCTAL Petrochemicals

  • Enrico Camerinelli

    Moderated by: Enrico Camerinelli Supply Chain Programme Development, UNECE and Senior Analyst, Aite Group

 

Networking concierge (arranging of one to one meetings)

 

iNTRODuciNG THE TXF ETHical supply cHaiN suRVEy

  • Jonathan Bell

    Jonathan Bell Editor-in-Chief, TXF

  • Enrico Camerinelli

    Enrico Camerinelli Supply Chain Programme Development, UNECE and Senior Analyst, Aite Group

 

Networking concierge (arranging of one to one meetings)

 

Coffee break

  • Everybody

 

Networking concierge (arranging of one to one meetings)

 

uNDERsTaNDiNG THE iNTERplay BETWEEN pROcuREMENT aND TREasuRy

  • Prof. Dr. Michael Henke

    Prof. Dr. Michael Henke Fraunhofer Institute for Material Flow and Logistics, IML

  • Dr. David Wuttke

    Dr. David Wuttke Research Fellow, EBS Business School

 

Networking concierge (arranging of one to one meetings)

 

cORpORaTE pERspEcTiVEs: THE GREaTBalaNciNG acT

  • Wadim Buuttner

    Wadim Buettner Program Manager Supply Chain Finance, OSRAM GmbH

  • Fred De Brabander

    Fred De Brabander Financial Controller, Philips Consumer Lifestyle

  • Pinaki Roy

    Pinaki Roy Project Treasury, Reliance Industries

 

Networking concierge (arranging of one to one meetings)

 

ONcE BiTTEN, TWicE sHy: HOW TO REpEal FROM a supply cHaiN aRRaNGEMENT aND cONViNcE sTakEHOlDERs TO TRy aGaiN

 

Lunch

  • Everybody

 
 

aFTER-luNcH kEyNOTE aDDREss:TRENDs iN TRaDE

  • John Ahearne

    John AhearnGlobal Head of Trade, Citi

 

WorksHOp: usiNG BpO

  • Urs Kern

    Urs KernSenior Sales Manager - Corporate Business, EMEA, SWIFT

  • Oliver Spitz

    Oliver SpitzDirector, Global Transaction Banking, Unicredit

 

THE TRaDE BaNk OF 2020

 

HElp OR HiNDRaNcE: THE ROlE OF sOFTWaRE iN TRaDE FiNaNcE

  • Enrico Camerinelli

    Enrico CamerinelliSupply Chain Programme Development, UNECE and Senior Analyst, Aite Group

 
 

Networking concierge (arranging of one to one meetings)

Coffee break

  • Everybody

 

cORpORaTE FiNaNcE sTRaTEGiEs aND BuyER/suppliER RElaTiONsHips iN cHallENGiNG MaRkET cONDiTiONs

  • Max Falkenberg

    Max Falkenberg Partner, Co-Head Global Competence Centre Corporate Performance, Roland Berger Strategy Consultants GmBH

 

WORksHOp: usiNG sEpa

  • Beate Hofmann

    Beate Hofmann Director, Trade Finance & Cash Management Corporates, Global Transaction Banking, Deutsche Bank

 

HOW caN suppliER ONBOaRDiNG BE MaDE MORE succEssFul?

 

MulTi-BaNk sOluTiONs: acHiEViNG sTaBiliTy:

  • Friedemann Kirchhof

    Friedemann Kirchhof Head of Supply Chain Finance, Siemens Treasury GmbH

 

COCKTAIL RECEPTION

  • Everybody

 
 
 
Breakfast briefing: a user's guide to export credit

This is an optional refresher session. The audience will be taken through some of the key tools and terms that are likely to be debated over the coming days. The session will act as a launchpad that will enhance the networking and understanding of those that take part.

The session will first and foremost be aimed at finance directors, procurement managers and treasurers

  • Enrico Camerinelli

    Enrico Camerinelli Supply Chain Programme Development, UNECE and Senior Analyst, Aite Group

WhAT cORpORATe TReAsuReRs ReAlly WAnT, WhAT BAnks ReAlly WAnT

With SCF only recently gaining more widespread acceptance amongst corporates, this debate will confront the suspicions that still exist head on.

How can SCF be used to make money for banks AND corporates? Do banks really listen to what corporates want from the product? What fears do corporates have and can these be alleviated?

  • Gary Slawther

    Gary Slawther Corporate Treasurer, OCTAL Petrochemicals

  • Michael Spiegel

    Michael Spiegel Global Head of Cash Management and Trade Finance, Deutsche Bank

a NEW ROaDMap FOR supply cHaiN FiNaNcE: WHaT is supply cHaiN FiNaNcE aNyWay?

Concepts and products have changed, many questions remain unanswered – how can critical mass be obtained? Is supply chain finance sold in the right way, by the right people? Has technology (and have technology companies) helped, hindered or confused the process? Is there enough liquidity to make the product work? A panel of industry leaders attempt to answer these questions and analyse the various approaches taken to supply chain finance

  • Thomas Dunn

    Thomas Dunn Chairman, Orbian

  • Markus Wohlgeschaffen

    Markus Wohlgeschaffen Managing Director, Global Head of Trade Finance & Services, Unicredit Group

  • Mathieu Le Brigand

    Mathieu Le Brigand Global Head of Supply Chain Management, Global Transaction Banking / Global Trade Solutions, BNP Paribas

  • Gary Slawther

    Gary Slawther Corporate Treasurer, OCTAL Petrochemicals

  • Enrico Camerinelli

    Moderated by: Enrico Camerinelli Supply Chain Programme Development, UNECE and Senior Analyst, Aite Group

iNTRODuciNG THE TXF ETHical supply cHaiN suRVEy

TXF is currently undertaking a survey of buyers and suppliers to explore how various companies support their supply chain – what tools are in place to support suppliers? How do different companies measure the importance of low costs versus a stable supplier network? What are the biggest challenges to keeping such a network secure?
The survey takes place between October and December 2013. Here we will announce some preliminary findings. Full results will be announced in January 2014 (all attendees will receive a free copy of the survey)

  • Jonathan Bell

    Jonathan Bell Editor-in-Chief, TXF

  • Enrico Camerinelli

    Enrico Camerinelli Supply Chain Programme Development, UNECE and Senior Analyst, Aite Group

uNDERsTaNDiNG THE iNTERplay BETWEEN pROcuREMENT aND TREasuRy

Supply chain solutions must benefit treasury and procurement in equal measure

What are the needs of treasurers? How does this compare to procurement officers and crucially, their suppliers? Are these benefits being fully communicated? Are all sides involved in discussions from the beginning?

Understanding how these two departments interact contains the key to whether supply chain finance solutions are taken up.

  • Prof. Dr. Michael Henke

    Prof. Dr. Michael Henke Fraunhofer Institute for Material Flow and Logistics, IML

  • Dr. David Wuttke

    Dr. David Wuttke Research Fellow, EBS Business School

cORpORaTE pERspEcTiVEs: THE GREaT BalaNciNG acT sEssiON

Supporting suppliers. Managing risk. Increasing efficiency and looking to lower financing costs

Treasury, credit and procurement perspectives on when and how to use supply chain finance and other traditional trade products What strategies work in different situations? What goes into the decision making process? What has changed?

  • Wadim Buuttner

    Wadim Buettner Program Manager Supply Chain Finance, OSRAM GmbH

  • Fred De Brabander

    Fred De Brabander Financial Controller, Philips Consumer Lifestyle

  • Pinaki Roy

    Pinaki Roy Project Treasury, Reliance Industries

ONcE BiTTEN, TWicE sHy: HOW TO REpEal FROM a supply cHaiN aRRaNGEMENT aND cONViNcE sTakEHOlDERs TO TRy aGaiN

A capped-attendance discussion on this incredibly sensitive but vital topic.

Just because a solution does not work out, it does not mean the concept of supply chain finance is wrong. But if you have had a bad experience, how easy is it to remove yourself from the situation, and convince colleagues and stakeholders to try again with another provider? What if a major bank or liquidity supplier exits the space? Can the industry ever reach its potential if such flexibility to switch solutions easily and efficiently are not in place?

  •  
aFTER-luNcH kEyNOTE aDDREss:TRENDs iN TRaDE

How is the way trade banks are able to operate changing? What impact will this have on corporates and the sector at large? This session will look at the challenges currently facing financial institutions and what impact this is having on the provision of different trade products.

  • John Ahearne

    John AhearnGlobal Head of Trade, Citi

WorksHOp: usiNG BpO

Who will benefit in practice? What is the appetite amongst banks and corporates? What are the savings? What challenges have existed and how have these been eradicated? Corporate case studies included

  • Urs Kern

    Urs KernSenior Sales Manager - Corporate Business, EMEA, SWIFT

  • Oliver Spitz

    Oliver SpitzDirector, Global Transaction Banking, Unicredit

THE TRaDE BaNk OF 2020

The shake up to the banking market in recent times is the biggest in two decades. Will banks still be lenders in ten years time, or facilitators? Or technology providers? What sorts of products will they be offering, and more importantly, what should they be offering?

HElp OR HiNDRaNcE: THE ROlE OF sOFTWaRE iN TRaDE FiNaNcE

Technology solutions always look good on paper, but bad execution can damage the reputation of the industry and cost millions. When have technology solutions worked and when have they not, and why? What conditions need to be in place? Do some solutions over-stretch? Is enough liquidity unlocked?


This session will draw on the results of the recent tXF E-trade Finance Survey (available for free to all delegates) to answer these questions and more

  • Enrico Camerinelli

    Enrico CamerinelliSupply Chain Programme Development, UNECE and Senior Analyst, Aite Group

>cORpORaTE FiNaNcE sTRaTEGiEs aND BuyER/suppliER RElaTiONsHips iN cHallENGiNG MaRkET cONDiTiONs

Using the findings of the 2013 corporate restructuring survey as a basis, this session will analyse how different corporates are responding to economic and financial pressures, and how this is impacting the financial solutions treasurers are seeking (or able to seek). What impact will this have on the relationship between buyers and suppliers?

  • Max Falkenberg

    Max Falkenberg Partner, Co-Head Global Competence Centre Corporate Performance, Roland Berger Strategy Consultants GmBH

WORksHOp: usiNG sEpa

A guide to ensuring compliance across procurement, IT and treasury How easy is it to implement in practice? What has been the experience of different companies? What are the benefits?

  • Beate Hofmann

    Beate Hofmann Director, Trade Finance & Cash Management Corporates, Global Transaction Banking, Deutsche Bank

HOW caN suppliER ONBOaRDiNG BE MaDE MORE succEssFul?

This is an interactive discussion designed to provoke ideas from all participants Failure to on-board a critical mass of suppliers is a huge industry problem. Do we understand what suppliers require from a supply chain finance solution? Is this being adequately communicated? How can solutions be tailored to these needs? Is enough time spent with suppliers? Could hub companies do more to bring suppliers around?

MulTi-BaNk sOluTiONs: acHiEViNG sTaBiliTy:

For corporates, dealing with multiple banks should – in theory – mean a more stable cash flow and a more secure funding base in times of economic disruption. For banks, it should mean an increased flexibility and a stronger commitment to ensuring clients are serviced by supply chain finance in the way they should be.


In practical terms, such arrangements can be complex. Who leads transactions and who is the first port of call? Do more banks really mean more security in hard times? How easy is it to structure such solutions for companies across different regions and who sources the technology?

  • Friedemann Kirchhof

    Friedemann Kirchhof Head of Supply Chain Finance, Siemens Treasury GmbH

 

TRADE FlOWs as aN iNVEsTMENT VEHiclE

  • John Luu

    John Luu Executive Director, Head of Supply Chain Finance Product EMEA, JPMorgan

sEcuRiTizaTiON OF TRaDE REcEiVaBlEs: is iT ViaBlE? HOW caN iT BE uTilizED?

  • Adrian Katz

    Adrian Katz CEO, Finacity

 

THE lc is DEaD, lONG liVE THE lc

 

Coffee break

  • Everybody

 
 

Private meetings

 

THE FOuR-sTEp GuiDE TO MakiNG TRaDE appEaliNG TO iNVEsTORs

  •  
 

RiDiNG THE WaVE: THE laTEsT REGulaTiON HiTTiNG THE sEcTOR

  •  
 

sTRucTuRiNG DOcuMENTaTiON THaT allOWs iNVEsTOR TakE up

  •  
 

BasEl iii: WHaT DOEs iT MEaN FOR BaNks, WHaT DOEs iT MEaN FOR cOMpaNiEs?

  •  
 

Lunch

  • Everybody

 
 

sOuRciNG lOcally: NEW liquiDiTy usiNG lOcal BaNks

  • Rudolf Putz

    Rudolf Putz Head of Trade Facilitation Programme, EBRD

 

Networking concierge (arranging of one to one meetings)

 

AGENcy assisTaNcE

  • Dominique Meessen

    Dominique Meessen Head of Underwriting and Account Management, ONDD - The Belgian Export Credit Agency

 

TRaDE FlOWs BRiEFiNG: THE GlOBal GuiDE TO TRaDE

  •  
 

susTaiNaBlE supply cHaiN

 

THE pRacTicaliTiEs OF usiNG cREDiT iNsuRaNcE TO uNlOck NEW liquiDiTy iN THE supply cHaiN

  • Neil ross

    Neil ross Trade Credit, Regional Manager EMEA, AIG

 

CLOSE OF CONFERENCE

  • All participants receive delegate list and 2013 Special Report

 
 
 
THE lc is DEaD, lONG liVE THE lc

Despite the mass increase in open account trading, and a plethora of new solutions, LCs still represent 40% of all global trade

What is the role of the LC in modern trade?

When is it still the preferred tool for companies and why? Do banks understand this?

An LC is an LC – but do providers need to spend less time focusing on alternatives, and more time improving processes, terms and pricing on the incumbant product?

Where will LC-based trade be in ten years time? Will anyone still use paper

An open discussion on the future of the letter of credit

TRADE FlOWs as aN iNVEsTMENT VEHiclE

Theoretically, there is a natural match between a trade finance sector in need of new sources of liquidity, and an investor class looking for yield in new places.

But putting theory aside, is there really enough impetus to standardize, document and open up when it has never happened in the past?

Can the trade finance industry pull this off and who will benefit if it does?

Who wants to buy trade assets, why, and for how long?

How does this fit in with what corporates require from trade finance solutions? Does originate and distribute work for companies?

  • John Luu

    John Luu Executive Director, Head of Supply Chain Finance Product EMEA, JPMorgan

sEcuRiTizaTiON OF TRaDE REcEiVaBlEs: is iT ViaBlE? HOW caN iT BE uTilizED?

The liquidity shortages of the past few years have made securitization of trade receivables a more viable option for corporates than it has been previously. How does the process work for companies and when can it be used? Will it continue to be a viable option as the economic recovery takes shape? What sort of volumes are needed to make it work?

  • Adrian Katz

    Adrian Katz CEO, Finacity

THE FOuR-sTEp GuiDE TO MakiNG TRaDE appEaliNG TO iNVEsTORs

Trade as an investment vehicle: a four-step process

1. Standardization

2. Documentation

3. Technology

4. Implementation

Exploring timelines, obstacles, pitfalls, the rewards of getting it right, and whether ultimately, investors really want trade assets...


1. sTANDARDIZATION

"Blessed are the cheese-makers": standardizing key terms, definitions and pricing....

Different terms mean different things to different institutions. This sends mixed messages to corporates in terms of what supply chain finance is and what it can deliver. Similarly, it increases uncertainty amongst investors looking at investing in the trade finance product. How can standardization be implemented, and then disseminated globally? Is there industry consensus to make this happen?

Will more prices for trade deals get disclosed? How necessary is this? How likely is it non-disclosure could prove a major obstacle?


2. DOCUMENTATION

creating strong paper

Turning standardized terms into standardized documents What needs to be in place, who are the stakeholders, and how quickly can this get implemented?

Should the industry be actively seeking out investor advice on this? Are investor demands realistic and in line with corporate needs? How will these documents work electronically?


TECHNOLOGY

Total visibility for investors: can it be delivered?

Investors need to know what their exposure is at all times. Trade finance has had a traditional opaqueness that runs in direct contrast to this. Technology - efficient, automated, standardized; can increase visibility. Does the technology exist? If not, how soon can we create it and who needs to be involved?

4. IMPLEMENTATION

a) X-Rated: Do ratings agencies get trade finance?

With investor interest in trade finance assets increasing, ratings agencies will become increasingly important – but how can the right ratings be secured? How can bankers and corporates help rating agencies to understand the risks involved in trade finance? Is there a danger agencies will see country and company, not risk and collateral?

Can trade finance learn from other industry’s experiences, like credit cards or remittances?


b) Getting trade assets to market

Will there be a need for an intermediary body to drive the process?

Can ECAs, other government agencies and multilaterals play a wider role and guarantee transactions?

RiDiNG THE WaVE: THE laTEsT REGulaTiON HiTTiNG THE sEcTOR

A briefing on local and international regulation and the impact on international companies, banks and local players

What will it cost to comply? Who are the winners and losers? Best and worst case scenarios

This session gives the perfect opportunity to obtain free advice on the regulatory issues that are (or should?) be keeping you up at night

sTRucTuRiNG DOcuMENTaTiON THaT allOWs iNVEsTOR TakE up

Following on from the four step plan, this session allows all participants to debate what needs to be in investor-friendly documentation, and how should it be drafted? Can one document work for all?

Financiers, companies, lawyers and investors are invited to exchange views

BasEl iii: WHaT DOEs iT MEaN FOR BaNks, WHaT DOEs iT MEaN FOR cOMpaNiEs?

What are bank experts telling their teams? How will this impact lenders and borrowers? Will supply chain finance be better placed or worse hit? What will it do for pricing? This session talks the fundamentals of the requirements as they are likely to hit trade, your cost of capital and your business.

sOuRciNG lOcally: NEW liquiDiTy usiNG lOcal BaNks

Are local banks at a natural advantage over those operating in multiple jurisdictions? What damage has exposure to regulation done to international banks and how can local banks take advantage? Is there enough skill on the ground? Is there enough liquidity?

How can development banks be used to enhance liquidity and educate local providers to become part of the supply chain?

  • Rudolf Putz

    Rudolf Putz Head of Trade Facilitation Programme, EBRD

AGENcy assisTaNcE

How are ECAs working to support SMEs thought various supplier guarantee and working capital initiatives? What are the needs? Are such developments here to stay?

  • Dominique Meessen

    Dominique Meessen Head of Underwriting and Account Management, ONDD - The Belgian Export Credit Agency

TRaDE FlOWs BRiEFiNG: THE GlOBal GuiDE TO TRaDE

A guide to the top trade flows and destinations globally.

Where is trade expanding? Who are the key players? What are the risks and the barriers that exist?

Needs, challenges and opportunities – around the world in 80 minutes

susTaiNaBlE supply cHaiN

Sourcing ethically and transparently is more important than ever before. With companies increasingly under the microscope, and reputations won and lost in minutes on social media websites, both treasurers and procurers have to be careful, consistent and clear in their operations and the way they deal with suppliers.

Open discussion on how supply chain finance solutions can aide the management of this process for companies - allowing more input on the ground, and the involvement of more organisations in the due diligence process.

THE pRacTicaliTiEs OF usiNG cREDiT iNsuRaNcE TO uNlOck NEW liquiDiTy iN THE supply cHaiN

New platforms and technologies have been developed that can potentially allow corporates, large and small, additional access to liquidity via credit insurance. This session will analyse the uses of such products in terms of compliance, trade finance, securitization and credit management. When are such products appropriate? What are the real life experiences? What is the process?

  • Neil ross

    Neil ross Trade Credit, Regional Manager EMEA, AIG

Legend
  • Briefing and training
  • Plenary session
  • Relationship building
  • Idea lab
The Westin Grand Munich
Arabellastrasse 6
81925 Munich,
Event enquiries: 00 49 (0) 89 9264 0
Website: Please click here

The Westin Grand Munich is located in the Bogenhausen district, easily accessed from Munich Airport (MUC), and only 10 minutes by car from central Munich and the train station. Munich’s famous park, the English Garden, is a short walk away.

TXF have arranged discounted rooms for all our clients at the affordable rate of 159 Euros per night.. Please use following link: https://www.starwoodmeeting.com/Book/TXFLtd

For further information, please contact [email protected]

 

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