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Results found: 9
Pit bull or pit bear?
Pit bull or pit bear?
Sean Keating
31 July 2019

The problems at the Oyu Tolgoi mining project in Mongolia mean the sponsors, Rio Tinto via its ownership of Turquoise Hill Resources, will have to raise $1 billion-plus more debt for the scheme. But is additional debt or a full refinancing the more likely outcome?

Expert opinion: Will sanctions kill the dollar?
Expert opinion: Will sanctions kill the dollar?
Matthew Oresman
25 July 2019

Matthew Oresman and Henrietta Worthington, partner and associate at Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP, take a look at why they think US policy represents the greatest threat to the world’s leading currency.

US Foreign and Trade Policy: Navigating the straits of bipartisanship
US Foreign and Trade Policy: Navigating the straits of bipartisanship
Matthew Oresman
5 April 2019

With Congress split between a Republican Senate and a Democrat House of representatives, there are three key areas where the changing US political dynamic will affect trade – attitudes to Russia, China and the role of the new IDFC. For anyone seeking safe passage through these unpredictable times – a nuanced understanding of these key points and the chief policymakers is a must.

Deadlocked on debt
Deadlocked on debt
Oliver Gordon
30 January 2018

Iran has yet to produce the project and trade flows bankers hoped for following signing of the JCPOA in 2016. The hurdles are largely born of the Trump administration – but not all. And while European lenders remain wary, Iran is looking eastward for debt.

Trump towers over trade finance
Trump towers over trade finance
Callum Burroughs
17 November 2016

Donald Trump’s election last Tuesday may have only surprised pollsters but there was a mixed reaction in the trade financing space. The potential effects of Trump’s mooted policies will be felt across world trade and could potentially spell trouble ahead for the industry.

New OFAC directive provides further damage to international trade with Russia
New OFAC directive provides further damage to international trade with Russia
Callum Burroughs
16 September 2016

US and EU sanctions against Russia came into effect in 2014 and two years later their effect has led to an economic slowdown, and limited financing opportunities. The recent re-iteration of these sanctions serves to remind the business and financing communities of the intense damage to international trade these sanctions are having.

Why are banks still steering clear of Iran? Q&A with Matthew Oresman
Why are banks still steering clear of Iran? Q&A with Matthew Oresman
Helen Reid
17 May 2016

The lifting of Iranian sanctions following the country’s nuclear deal with the US heralded a wave of transactions and many predicted a gold rush.Global payment processor SWIFT started reconnecting Iranian banks to its system in January after four years of isolation, enabling them to process international payments. However, banks are still highly wary of going into transactions in the country, with the shadow of hefty fines slapped on BNP Paribas, Standard Chartered and others, hanging over them.

Iranian sanctions: relief on the horizon
Iranian sanctions: relief on the horizon
Steve Farmer
23 November 2015

Pillsbury Law’s Steve Farmer and Matthew Oresman discuss significant steps taken on both sides of the divide, and the implications for the trade finance industry?

Russia sanctions and trade finance: time to update procedures
Russia sanctions and trade finance: time to update procedures
Matthew Oresman
29 September 2015

Sanctions on Russia and Crimea have introduced additional regulatory and commercial considerations for companies engaging in business transactions with certain parties in Russia and Ukraine. These sanctions continue to evolve regularly, and the US, EU, and other countries are working to ensure that existing provisions have sustained impact.