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Report analyses how much US Ex-Im promotes US exports

A recent report carried out by Nottingham University investigates the impact of the Export-Import Bank of the United States (US Ex-Im) on US exports particularly in the wake of international competition from foreign national export credit agencies (ECAs). TXF's Max Thompson reveals the report's findings.

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Comments (2)

  • William Laraque
    William Laraque, US-International Trade Services 8 September 2016

    I think that this is a very significant analysis because it deals with bureaucratic illusion. Bureaucrats consistently justify their existence, functions and jobs by self-serving allusions to effectiveness and even efficiency. During the nearly four years that I spent at US Ex-Im, we helped dozens of SMEs to export by providing mostly export credit insurance. I was responsible for business development in New England. The river towns of New England and the Connecticut Valley are known as the birthplaces of the American Industrial Revolution and it did not surprise me that with a bit of help, the traditional Yankee ingenuity could be marshaled into export prowess. The Chicago office of Ex-Im was also noteworthy. It is where my former respected colleague led untold numbers of SMEs to export. As the Nottingham study notes, there is little public recognition in the US of the importance of exporting and even less of the role that government plays in stimulating exports. Today, US e-commerce platforms have taken the lead and have garnered a first-mover advantage in catalyzing exports by SMEs. It takes cataclysms to wake democracies up, to make the public in democratic societies aware of the inportance of exports and of scaling globally. Regrettably, it will take yet another economic disaster to focus the public attention on how to effectively globalize and to scale globally by selling to global markets. This awakening will never depend on bureaucrats. It will depend as it always has on business leaders who will show our political leaders the way. What the Nottingham study missed entirely is the role that quasi-governmental export credit insurers play in catalyzing exports. By teaching countless exporters and would be exporters how export credit insurance works, institutions like US Ex-Im created the dynamic whereby insurance agencies ate the global bank lunch and took over the task of enabling exports.

  • William Laraque
    William Laraque, US-International Trade Services 8 September 2016

    I think that this is a very significant analysis because it deals with bureaucratic illusion. Bureaucrats consistently justify their existence, functions and jobs b

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